Archive for the 'Artists' Category

Jacob Goble – Studio Visit – July 26th, 2011

Studio Visit: Jacob Goble
Date: Tuesday, July 26th

Location: Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Jacob Goble Studio Visit 7/26/11

Beach Vacation (image courtesy of Jacob Goble)

The Wheel 2011 (courtesy of Jacob Goble)

Jacob Goble

Since our last studio visit with Jacob Goble over a year ago, he has continued to investigate and hone three primary trajectories:

1) A developing series of abstract linear drawings that are non-repeating permutations of an arch shape.

2) Drawings made from observation in park, museum and domestic settings executed with aesthetically varied and developed mark making.

3) Paintings informed by the drawings, photographs and the book of arches.

While each of these elements of Jacob’s total body of work is produced largely independently from one-another, there is also significant crossover between the three directions. Most commonly the observational drawings act as preliminary work to the paintings. Jacob has also incorporated arches from the books of abstract into his paintings focusing on a particular shape and adding color and brushwork. In some paintings the shape/symbol is used as an overlay on an image of a landscape, in effect, encrypting the landscape language. In other paintings the arch shape is within a wholly abstract canvas, investigations on building an image from formal elements alone.

Jacob described the way he chooses his varied images and content as allowing himself to get attached to an idea or image without committing to putting it in all his work. The group discussed the interplay between nature and artifice in Jacob’s work. There seems to be balance between invention, reference, and removal in each of Jacob’s projects. In his directly observed drawings a level of illusionistic abstraction through mark making is apparent. In some paintings Jacob has combined observed landscape with invented elements and color schemes. In his paintings that are made using observed source material, surface details and foreground/background distinctions pull against the illusion of the image depicted. In the abstract arch books there too seems to be an embrace of a fluid evolution of form.

Perhaps on account of its scale, color palette and graphic presentation, one painting accrued more discussion than the others. The largest canvas in the studio depicted a nearly life size depiction of the Wheel of Fortune wheel positioned as if the viewer was a contestant who has just won a trip to New York. Jacob has edited the image he photographed from his television screen, leaving only the iconic wheel and light colored field below. The group discussed the relatively hard-edged and slick mark making used in this painting and compared it to the small preliminary painting that informed the larger final work. The idea of making a drawing of the wheel was discussed as well as a return to using inks to encourage the mark making exhibited in the observed pencil drawings.

When asked how he would formally exhibit his different modes of working, he answered that he would show the different works together, drawings alongside the paintings.

 

-Amanda Lechner

 

Discussion Links:
Keith Tyson
Charles Birchfield
Decorative Art – Met
Structures: The Arch

Beach Bum, 8x10in, Oil on Canvas, 2011

Page 186, 2011

www.jacobgoble.com

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Satellite Studio Fuse – Audra Wolowiec at Wassaic Project

Audra Wolowiec is in residence this month at Wassiac Project in Wassaic, NY.

A note from Audra:

Wassaic has been a great experience – having a huge amount of space to work and think removed from the pace of the city. It seems everyone participates to create a sense of community – from the CSA farm onsite to open studios to the local general store. The first image is of the barn that houses more than 10 artist studios, a woodshop, silkscreen studio, food project space, auction ring (and more, the barn is an enormous converted 1875 livestock auction house) and the following images are from my studio – text pieces, concrete casts, and plaster stencils experimenting with objects that convey the physicality of sound through language and voice.

The Wassaic Project is an artist-run sustainable, multidisciplinary arts organization that focuses on community engagement and facilitates artists and participants to exhibit, discuss, and connect with art, each other, our unique site, and the surrounding area.

http://www.wassaicproject.org/

www.audrawolowiec.com

Audra Wolowiec – Studio Visit – August 4th, 2010

Studio Fuse is excited to present a studio visit and conversation with artist Audra Wolowiec Wednesday, August 4th, at her studio in Brooklyn.

blog: www.lineforms.blogspot.com
website: www.audrawolowiec.com
Studio AND: www.andindustries.org

Left-Alexis Semter- Right to Left-Nik Pence, Meridith Pingree, Kai Viestra, Susie Huang

Yuka Otani, Rebecca Sherman, Stephanie Lempert, Susie Hwang

Audra Wolowiec

private space in a public time

Synopsis:

Much of Audra Wolowiec’s work is related to sound, often  considerering sound in relation to understanding language. At times  Audra creates silence and absence where there was sound or content. In her audio piece, private space in a public time, Audra recorded Vito Acconci’s text, Public Space in a Private Time, read it aloud, and then edited out the middle of each spoken word. The result is a sound piece of breathy noises separated by short intervals of quiet. In a simlilar vein, for the Sound of Silence Audra has sanded smooth the Simon and Garfunkel single rendering it recording-less.

Often Audra’s work does not implicitly utilize sound but is indexical to it. In some of her sculptures she has created objects from spaces that hold, carry, or buffer sound. She cast the negative space within a megaphone and cast squares of sound absorbing foam in concrete, a material that has been used to reflect sound in military and industrial applications. During her studio visit, Audra also presented works on paper featuring shapes similar to these sculptures. The screened concrete prints seemed to function as supporting material for the sculptures or as quiet notes on their own.

In another project Audra clipped images of lips from a daily newspaper reconfiguring the mouth gestures as small collages. These pieces are meant to be read as musical sound scores as much as they are visual compositions. As scores, the compositions have been performed by singers, musicians and acted out by the artist. During the studio visit they were presented  as visual context only. When collaborating with others Audra likes to give over as much control as possible to her collaborators laving the experiences and outcomes open-ended. The group discussed interpretation when discussing this work; “Where is the work in the instruction or in the interpretation of a given project?”

Audra is moving towards inviting or creating experiences in a space. There is a fine line between what is given by the artist and what is required of the viewer. The group discussed the delayed experience of the slow read of some of Audra’s work and questioned whether her approach involves a building up or paring down when conceiving and creating her projects. She responded that her process involves paring down her ideas and methods; she is aiming for a point that is just enough information to communicate an idea or feeling.

During the studio visit and discussion participants brought up a range of other topics and ideas that are related to communication such as reading micro-expressions, speech analysis, coding, ransom notes and transcription.

-Amanda Lechner

Links:

Donald Judd

Anne Hamilton “face to face” photos

John Cage

Christian Marclay recent Whitney Museum exhibition

specific indexical semiotic sound use in film

How to detect micro expressions

Sound Physics 101

Bio:

Audra Wolowiec’s multidisciplinary artwork mines themes of communication, voice, and ephemeral moments of the everyday. In recreating phenomena and trace effects, she explores the idea of a fading connection to create an elusive but shared experience.

Her work is often collaborative in nature and includes a series of performance scores that have been performed in New York and Los Angeles. She also works under Studio AND, a collaborative project with the artist and designer Niels Cosman. Together they have shown work at Flux Factory, Conflux Festival, and their project Urban Meteorites will be featured in Issue 38: Futures of Threshold Magazine by MIT Press.

Audra received an MFA in Sculpture from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2007 and BFA in Textiles from the University of Michigan in 2002. Her work has been shown at Art in General (New York), Pocket Utopia (Brooklyn), and the Museum of New Art (Detroit).

Artist Residency Roundtable


Artist Residency Roundtable

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010

Location: Chelsea, Manahattan

The Artist Residency Roundtable is organized by Audra Wolowiec and Yuka Otani as a part of Studio Fuse’s ongoing mission to foster dialog and to share resources among artists. Guest artists will discuss their personal and professional experiences at various residency programs in New York City and across the country from LMCC, Socrates Sculpture Park, Skowhegan, Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, MacDowell, Yaddo and Djaressi, to name a few. Artists will present their work and an open, roundtable discussion will follow. A comprehensive list of available resources online and in print, for national and international artist residencies, will accompany the discussion.

Participating Artists:

Laura Braciale – www.laurabraciale.com
Rachel Frank – www.rachelfrank.com
James Huang – www.james-huang.com
Stephanie Lempert – www.stephanielempert.com
Christopher Robbins – http://www.christopher-robbins.com
Yuka Otani – www.yukaotani.com

Yuka Otani at Chashama North

Stephanie Lempert at Socrates Sculpture Park

Rachel Frank at Sculpture Space

Laura Braciale at LMCC Studio

Christopher Robbins at Art Farm, Nebraska

James Huang at Yaddo

RESOURCES

Residencies /Artist Opportunities:

* Alliance of Artists Communities – www.artistcommunities.org

* NYFA Source – www.nyfa.org

* Res Artis – www.resartis.org

* Trans Artists – www.transartists.nl

* Re-Title.com – www.re-title.typepad.com/opportunities

* Residency Unlimited – www.residencyunlimited.org/category/opportunites/

* Art Deadline List – www.artdeadlineslist.com

* Nuture Art Calendar – www.nurtureart.org/nurtureart/index.php?ptr=page&pgid=229

* The Arts Council of Lapland (AiR programs in northern areas of Finland, Norway, and Sweden)

www.artslap.fi/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=19&Itemid=21

* AIR_J (AiR programs in Japan) – http://en.air-j.info/search

* Alternative Spaces / Opportunities by Region: “Phonebook” by Green Lantern Press (purchase online for $15)

www.press.thegreenlantern.org/store.html

Other great resources to look at:

* College Art Association (online search + ‘standard guidelines’ resource for cv, etc) – www.collegeart.org

* NYFA Learning (tips for grant writing and project proposals etc.) – www.nyfa.org/level2.asp?id=76&fid=1&sid=781

* Foundation Center (grants for individuals) – www.foundationcenter.org/getstarted/individuals

QUESTIONS / THOUGTS FOR DISCUSSIONS

On application:

-How did you hear about this program?

-Did you propose what you were going to do? How specific was your proposal?

-Did you know anyone? Did you have a prior personal connection with a resident / instructor / board member?

-If you submitted a proposal, was it site-specific to the program?

-What kind of resources do you use to search for residency programs?

-How often do you send applications? How many residency applications have you done so far?

-Did you get into the program in one shot, or did you apply more than once?

Pros and cons:

-What were individual residency programs like? Was it productive?

-Were you content with the accommodation / work space / facilities provided?

-What kind of supports (separate live/work spaces, stipend etc.) did you have from the program?

-Were you required to pay or work?

-How long was the residency? Was it a desirable length for completing your project?

-Did you have a lot of interaction with fellow residents?

Outcome:
-Did the residency culminate in an exhibition?

-Was it difficult to transport your work home from the residency?

-Did you gain opportunities because of this residency? Was the residency professionally helpful?

-Did you start off with a lesser-known program to get into more well-known program?

*  *  *

Studio Fuse on Tour: Recent studio visits in Provincetown, MA

April 18th, 2010 we had the opportunity to make three quick studio visits in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

Taylor Baldwin is in his final weeks of his second year as a fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Province Town. Taylor’s sculptures, drawings and installations bring together disparate imagery from natural history, the everyday, and the fantastic to form new sometimes impossible relationships between the constructed objects and ideas. He is now preparing for a residency at Bemis Center for Contemporary Art in Omaha.

Taylor Baldwin

"i ain't afraid of no ghosts" image courtesy of Taylor Baldwin

Matt Bollinger is also a FAWC fellow. Matt’s work often reconstructs memory and other abstracted narratives through drawing and painting.  Most of his current pieces of work are large or near life scale graphite drawings with surprising levels of surface texture and gesture.

"Screen Door" image courtesy of Matt Bollinger

Matt Bollinger

Meghan Gordon is a FAWC alumni currently working in Provincetown. Meghan’s recent sculptures and drawings replicate objects of historical-narrative value, translating them part-by-part in new materials and presenting them in new contexts. She Recently finished a residency at the MacDowell Colony where she began some of the work that is in-progress in her studio.

"Replacement Wood-Burning Stove for Edwin Dickinson’s Studio" image courtesy of Meghan Gordon

Bohyun Yoon Studio Visit January 21st 2009


As soon as I entered the military in Korea, my superiors tried to brainwash all the new soldiers in regards to who our enemy is, why we have to obey them and so on. This training methodology and military law were very well structured and very effectively organized to control new troops. I was reading Michael Foucult’s “Discipline and Punish” in the military and this book is all about how Western governments have historically developed all kinds of punishments and penalties to control citizens in a very intellectual way. I could analyze the military system better through actually experiencing it. In the end, I felt that humans are weak and fragile, spiritless animals under certain rule, certain harsh conditions.

This work is an installation piece in which I present a mix of male and female toy-like rubber figures hung with strings marching in one direction, one after another. Hanging like puppets, the figures portray the idea of a group as opposed to an individual. A simple light and shadow trick is key in this work and becomes a metaphor for invisible power or tricks of politics in our society. When the viewer approaches the work, their weight makes this structure shake and all the figures dance.

Bohyun Yoon

Discussion Links:

Plato’s Allegory of the Cave

Phantom Limbs and Mirrors on RadioLab Tuesday, October 09, 2007

Cornelia Parker

Tim Noble and Sue Webster


Grants & Fellowships Calendar

The calendar is undergoing maintenance and will return shortly.

NURTUREart = green